Through interest from many parishioners, St. James’ has formed a Racial Justice & Reconciliation Commission to do our part in the community.  This group of active volunteers meets regularly and is committed to sharing important information to St. James’ Family regarding Racial Justice.  This Commission will share resource material here and within the weekly newsletter.  Be sure to check out the “Did you know?” articles in the weekly helping to share facts and insights. And monthly, there are events and programs sponsored to help educate and open our minds!

2022 Welcome to the Season of Open & Curious!

Upcoming and Past Topics

Did You Know? By Emma Cowley

In need of a new book to read? Why not support a Hispanic or Latinx writer? Click the arrow for a brief description of each book.

A memoir that details her journey as a child from Mexico to one of media’s most vocal advocates for Latinx storytelling.

A memoir that focuses on her coming-of-age in Philadelphia, born to a Puerto Rican mother and a Jewish father, and how that upbringing led to her career as a prolific wordsmith.

A story of two sisters—Camino, who lives in the Dominican Republic, and Yahaira, who lives in New York—who discover each others’ existence when their father dies in the real-life plane crash of Flight 587 in 2001, just two months before September 11.

When Nesto Vasquez moves his food truck from the city of New York to upstate New York, near Ithaca, he feels like a fish out of water away from the comforts of his Dominican neighborhood. But then he meets the mysterious Jude Fuller who seems set on helping this city boy adjust to a slower-paced life.

This short fiction read brings together some of today’s most prominent Latinx voices.

The novel takes place at a school in North Carolina that begins accepting students from the predominantly Black side of town. Through multiple perspectives, at the heart of this story are two mothers who clash while advocating for their children…but just might be more alike than they think.

“Latinx” is a relatively new term, but the 60 million people who are considered to fall under that umbrella are hardly uniform. Ramos traveled around the United States to research this book, structured as a series of vignettes featuring members of the Latinx community.

The novel places the current immigration system in conversation with the historic displacement of Indigenous Americans.